Architecture: Course

Jack D.Weiler

Studio 4th-5th year

7468
Baer Yuval, Arch., Semester 1, Monday, 11:00-14:30
Baer Yuval, Arch., Semester 1, Thursday, 15:00-19:00
Elfassy Natanel, Semester 1, Monday, 11:00-14:30
Erez Tal, Semester 1, Monday, 11:00-14:30
Erez Tal, Semester 1, Thursday, 15:00-19:00
Gross Ron, Arch., Semester 1, Monday, 11:00-14:30
Gross Ron, Arch., Semester 1, Thursday, 15:00-19:00
Gutman Rivka, Arch., Semester 1, Monday, 11:00-14:30
Gutman Rivka, Arch., Semester 1, Thursday, 15:00-19:00
Handel Dan, Dr. Arch.‎, Semester 1, Monday, 11:00-14:30
Handel Dan, Dr. Arch.‎, Semester 1, Thursday, 15:00-19:00
Joana Couto Chartiel, Semester 1, Monday, 11:00-14:30
Joana Couto Chartiel, Semester 1, Thursday, 15:00-19:00
kharouf Ahmad, Semester 1, Monday, 11:00-14:30
kharouf Ahmad, Semester 1, Thursday, 15:00-19:00
Klein Yossi, Dr. Arch.‎, Semester 1, Monday, 11:00-14:30
Klein Yossi, Dr. Arch.‎, Semester 1, Thursday, 15:00-19:00
Shabtay Ran, Semester 1, Monday, 11:00-14:30
Zarhy Daniel, Semester 1, Monday, 11:00-14:30
Zarhy Daniel, Semester 1, Thursday, 15:00-19:00
6.0
The city during the 21st century is witnessing radical changes in its form, organization and structure as it is going through a processes of accelerated urbanization, unprecedented growth of density along with political and social crises. The multidimensional complexity of our contemporary cities can no longer be understood with the traditional methods of functional separations, between planning, urban design and architecture. These outdated categories challenge consensual methodologies and theories of architecture and urbanism. Since the 19th century, cities and their architecture have been understood by positivistic attitudes of urbanism and its dialectics. Also today, this same modernist agenda is still hiding behind disguises such as ecology, sustainability and economic functioning, as if the city is a nothing but a technocratic or technical system.Our mission is then, to radically re-conceptualize our cities and architecture by posing two questions: How is it built? How does it work? To re-think the architecture and politics of the classic household and eco-nomic unit 'oikos' as an urban structure of the city, its autonomies, its appropriation mechanism and to reconsider the relationships between the Habitat and the city while maintaining its poetic status.The machine of the city, like the machine d'habitation of Le Corbusier from the beginning of the 20th century, is still understood as a domain that is designed to work efficiently. Just as it is possible to arrange efficiently a residential unit based on concrete functions, it is possible to plan a city by arranging residential, work, recreation and transportation zones as separate entities along with some mixed-use areas. However, these divisions hide the unstated political and economic forces that lay behind them.Meanwhile, contemporary approaches challenge this line of thinking. We are now aiming for a new political architecture, which relies on consciousness and philosophic awareness, as a prerequisite for Research based on Architectural Design.